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Virtual Creep test

Solutions by Application

In the quest for more fuel-efficient turbines, developing heat resistant materials for turbine blades is a high priority. Mechanical properties and especially creep behaviour at high temperatures are of utmost importance, as turbine blade elongation determines the effective lifespan of the blade.

OpenPhase Studio is used here to simulate microstructure evolution under creep conditions and visualize creep behaviour, stress-strain diagrams and other properties of the simulated domain for more efficient material research.

Microstructure evolution

OpenPhase excels at simulating microstructure evolution under the consideration of various physical effects. In this example, creep in Ni-base superalloys at 950°C and 350 MPa stress is simulated. The microstructure evolution is determined by the interaction of Interface kinetics, Diffusion, Plasticity and Elasticity. All simulated quantities are available at all times in the simulation and yield quantities such as creep curve, phase fraction, element distribution, etc.

The simulation approach is very general and can be transferred to different material systems and processes where phase transformation and/or plasticity are of interest, such as tensile tests or heat treatments.

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Mechanical properties

For most metallic materials good mechanical properties are of paramount importance. These properties are determined by the grains, phases, precipitates and defects that make up the microstructure. In nickel-base superalloys gamma- and gamma'-phase form a unique microstructure with gamma' cubes embedded in a gamma matrix. This microstructure evolves during creep deformation and yields outstanding creep properties.

OpenPhase facilitates diffusion, phase transformation, elasticity and plasticity modules to simulate creep deformation in Ni-base superalloys precisely on a microstructural level. Spatial and temporal resolution of all simulated quantities (e.g. plastic strain in figures b and c) enables analysis of microstructural processes. The macroscopic effect of these processes is visualized in the creep curve (figure a).

The simulation approach is very general and can be transferred to different material systems and processes where phase transformation and/or plasticity are of interest, such as tensile tests or heat treatments.

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